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Ask The Trainer:"What is and how do we use the FMS"

Ask The Trainer:"What is and how do we use the FMS"

Christian Agudelo, Earvin Bahena, Spencer O'Neil, Nikki Davis

Christian Agudelo, ACSM - CPT

FMS stand for Functional Movement Screen. It consists of a series of movements used to test mobility and stability in the body. It is also used to test for any asymmetry that may exist in certain areas. The FMS gives us a clearer picture of what exercises to incorporate in an individual’s routine, as well as determining what exercises to avoid that may cause further asymmetry and/or discomfort.

Earvin Bahena, NSCA - CSCS

Functional Movement Screen is a tool used to identify asymmetries in a client’s movement patterns. With the FMS we aim to identify disparity in mobility and stability during 7 movement pattern tests. During these tests we place the clients in difficult positions to see how they fare and are rated on a scale of 0-3.  When a client scores below a 2 we know there is some sort of imbalance in the that specific movement and that movement can use some corrective work. By observing these test scores we are able to create a personalized workout program and dynamic warm up that best suits the client in order to improve their functional movement and avoid any injuries. 

Spencer O'Neil, NASM- CPT

FMS is fantastic tool for us to get an immediate understanding of what physical limitations a client might have. It is designed to challenge the body with certain movements that can be problematic when first starting an exercise routine. This allows us to determine the best plan of action to help improve or even avoid certain exercises all together. It provides a great starting point to begin the fitness journey.

Nikkie Davis

The FMS Functional Movement Screen is one of the most well recognized and researched movement screens available, to help identify weak links or incorrect movements patterns of the body by recognizing how the body is compensating to perform the movement. Various movements are provided and test things like hip flexion, balance, alignment, stability and mobility. An score of 0-3 for each movement is recorded based on the examiner and the most common total score accumulated is between 13-15. It is an essential tool to identify injuries, imbalances, and strengths in the body, helping to set the client up with a successful program, and reevaluate their progress made.